Backdating of stock option grants


21-Dec-2017 07:36

Backdating does not violate shareholder-approved option plans.Most shareholder approved option plans prohibit in-the-money option grants (and thus, backdating to create in-the-money grants) by requiring that option exercise prices must be no less than the fair market value of the stock on the date when the grant decision is made. For example, because backdating is used to choose a grant date with a lower price than on the actual decision date, the options are effectively in-the-money on the decision date, and the reported earnings should be reduced for the fiscal year of the grant.However, when granting options, the details of the grant must be disclosed, meaning that a company must clearly inform the investment community of the date that the option was granted and the exercise price. In addition, the company must also properly account for the expense of the options grant in their financials.If the company sets the prices of the options grant well below the market price, they will instantaneously generate an expense, which counts against income.The backdating companies broke this rule: they reported how many options they were issuing, but conveniently omitted the fact that they had been backdated. The bigger reason for choosing to backdate is to get around some bothersome accounting regulations.In Washington, people say that it’s not the crime that gets you—it’s the coverup. [C]ompanies didn’t need backdating to lavish huge sums of money on their executives: they could have issued more at-the-money options to make up the difference, or they could have just handed out grants of stock. Until recently, the regulations distinguished, for no good reason, between in-the-money and at-the-money options.An example illustrates the potential benefit of backdating to the recipient.

Do you ever wish that you could turn back the hands of time?You see, if you backdate stock options to a date when the price of the stock was lower, then the options are "in-the-money" when granted.